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The Authors

Terence Ball is Professor of Political Science at Arizona State University. Hugo Adam Bedau is Austin Fletcher Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at Tufts University. Norberto Bobbio is Emeritus Professor of Political Philosophy at the University of Turin, Italy. Luigi Bonanate is Professor of International Relations at the University of Turin, Italy. Ian Carter is a Research Fellow in Political Philosophy at the University of Pavia, Italy. Amedeo G. Conte is Professor of Philosophy of Law at the University of Pavia, Italy. Paolo Di Lucia is Professor of Philosophy of Law at the University of Camerino, Italy. Jean Bethke Elshtain is the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Professor of Social and Political Ethics at the University of Chicago. George Kateb is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics at Princeton University. Thomas Pogge is Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University. Mario Ricciardi is a Research Fellow in Jurisprudence at the University of Milan and Lecturer in Jurisprudence at the "C. Cattaneo" University, Castellanza. Hillel Steiner is Professor of Political Philosophy at the University of Manchester. Mark R. Weaver is Professor of Political Science at the College of Wooster.

 

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Ian Carter and Mario Ricciardi (eds), Freedom, Power and Political Morality. Essays for Felix Oppenheim, London: Palgrave, 2001, pp. 244, ISBN 0-333-76332-7.

This collection of new essays on political and legal theory concentrates on themes dealt with in the work of Felix Oppenheim. A first group of questions concerns the nature of fundamental concepts like freedom, power and interests. What are the differences between empirical freedom and freedom in relation to rules? Can concepts like freedom and power be given purely descriptive definitions? How are the "public interest" and the "national interest" to be defined? A second group of questions concerns the place of morality in power politics and international relations. Is a government ever really free to act against the national interest? Can it be morally obliged to do so? More generally, what role can moral questions (concerning, say, human rights or distributive justice) realistically have in the formulation of domestic and foreign policy? The volume ends with an essay by Felix Oppenheim in which he replies to some of his critics.

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Contents

Introduction
Ian Carter and Mario Ricciardi

PART I. NORMATIVE ANALYSIS AND POLITICAL CONCEPTS

1. Felix Oppenheim's Deontics
Paolo Di Lucia

2. From Hobbes to Oppenheim: Conceptual Reconstruction as Political Engagement
Terence Ball

3. Essential Contestability and the Claims of Analysis
Mario Ricciardi

4. Freedom and Bivalence
Hillel Steiner

5. Dimensions of Nomic Freedom
Amedeo G. Conte

6. 'Ought' implies 'Practical Possibility'
Ian Carter

7. Clarifying the Science Wars: The Concept of Scientific Authority
Mark R. Weaver

PART II. POLITICAL MORALITY AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

8. On Public Moral Appeals and Identification
Jean Bethke Elshtain

9. "Anarchical Fallacies": Bentham’s Attack on Human Rights
Hugo Adam Bedau

10. Preempting Humanitarian Interventions
Thomas Pogge

11. Oppenheim's Realism and the Morality of the National Interest
Luigi Bonanate

12. Oppenheim and the National Interest
George Kateb

PART III. CODA

13. Oppenheim in Italy: a Memoir
Norberto Bobbio

14. Afterthoughts
Felix E. Oppenheim

Bibliography of the Publications of Felix E. Oppenheim

Notes on Contributors

Index


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